The Result of Science?

Published by: Maureen J on 13th Feb 2018 | View all blogs by Maureen J

Rain has fallen in record-breaking amounts for months. Living in rural Carmarthenshire for the last twenty years, I have become aware of many physical as well as environmental changes.

We did get the occasional downpour that caused a flash torrent which picked up and carried a collection of debris along our country lane. As we are on a hill, it followed the natural contours and headed down to the brook that flows around  the village of Ferryside where it joins other tributaries as they feed into the Towy river that eventually joins  others in Carmarthen Bay.

Currently, all lanes and small roads in the surrounding countryside are awash with mud; the result of run-off from grass verges squashed and squelched under the huge wheels of giant tractors, milk tankers and articulated monsters delivering animal feed while incidentally doing some road-widening at the same time.

Last year, several surrounding fields were ploughed. It was the first time this had happened in the twenty years since my arrival. They were subsequently planted with corn which may have been intended for cattle-feed or bio-fuel. The ground was first sprayed with herbicide causing the fields to shrivel into rusty desiccation within two or three days. They were subsequently ploughed, further sprayed with cow-slurry and phosphates while being ingeniously tilled and drilled with seed in one mammoth operation. The results yielded bumper corn crops; possiby prompted by current EU farming policy, since more than one local farmer was involved.

Following the harvest, the fields have lain fallow without grass or plants of any kind – just acres of skeletal stalks sticking up from the mud; the whole resembling those battlefields depicted after World War I. With no plants soaking up the rain, the road alongside one of the fields near my home has flooded after every downpour with the field itself resembling a lake at the end nearest the road.

At a time when the world is being asked to be more environmentally aware, why are farmers using herbicides that must eventually leach toxins into the ecosystem, contaminating waterways and creating situations whereby fields are so poisonous they cannot grow grass. Is all this the result of science?

Comments

10 Comments

  • LJ E
    by LJ E 6 days ago
    It is all a result of greed with no thought for the future Maureen...It could be said that “You reap what you sow”
    I think in not too many years, if mankind continues to ravage the land, the only ‘reaping’ to be done will be by the Grim Reaper.....
  • Jackie H
    by Jackie H 6 days ago
    I will come back to this later for a full read but one thing I am sure of, they ( guess our councils ) dont or cant be clearing out our drains like they once did...in my opinion this is preventing rain from going where it should be going and causing a whole lot of our now floodings....blocked up drains...and dont get me started on our road pot holes, guess as usual, using cheaper and more inferior stuff for filling them in, whereby costing us the taxpayer more money to fix in the long run...Apologies if I have strayed off subject..I shall be back to read in full later...
  • Jackie H
    by Jackie H 6 days ago
    Oh that was the same they were doing to the field over the back of garden at our previous address... I remember the smell so vividly of the machine that was going around the field passing our fence to the back, ( had to keep the dogs in and shuting the kitchen back door ) as the fowl penetrating gassy fumes went circling around...even to watch the cloud of fumes spreading up from the back of the machine...
  • Maureen J
    by Maureen J 6 days ago
    The spume is from the liquid slurry - untreated cow dung ( among other things) that is sprayed under pressure from the tank drawn by the tractor. The same goes for the silage fields that undergo similar slurry spraying some months before the first crop is cut. The cutting is immediately followed by somewhere in the region of 200 cows grazing in the same field and liberally shedding their faeces still further on to the very grass they're eating. Then farmers claim that badgers spread tuberculosis and outbreaks of TB in cow herds has nothing to do with the husbandry associated with farming practices. Of course, it's all scientifically proven??? I'll never believe badgers spread TB as much as questionable farming practices.
  • Jackie H
    by Jackie H 6 days ago
    This did not smell like any animal dung I have ever come across....kind of reminded me of when they came around every morning with a massive spray gun and chemically fumed all around the outside of the hotel we first stayed in against mosquitoes in St Lucia...The smoke and smell was so bad and thick but something we daily got used to seeing being done.
  • LJ E
    by LJ E 6 days ago
    Couldn’t agree more with you Maureen re the spread of TB. I do sometimes wonder if the people who study these matters, and make the cruellest of decisions to cull badgers, have even half a brain.
  • Jackie H
    by Jackie H 5 days ago
    Who or what gives anyone the right to decide on culling badgers, or culling any wild animal or bird for whatever reasons they give...It is my belief it is survival of the fittest...everyone has the right to survive on this planet the best way that they can...
  • Maureen J
    by Maureen J 5 days ago
    Survival being the name of the game and 'man' the worst predator.
  • Jackie H
    by Jackie H 5 days ago
    Maureen, and not forgetting our cars on our roads, what chance do our poor wildlife have..
  • Maureen J
    by Maureen J 5 days ago
    Country roads have become killing zones. I live on one, and have been known to rail against the speed at which vehicles hurtle along when I'm walking facing oncoming traffic, or pruning my roadside bushes so they don't impede my view of the road when I join it from my driveway entrance. Good manners on our roads have all but disappeared, and we all suffer.
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